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When we talk about photographing behaviors and events as they unfold, we think in terms of being “reactive”, or shooting on the fly. In a studio setting, we are “proactive”, we make decisions about pretty much every characteristic of the photo before it is taken. My goal with wildlife photography is to be more “proactive” and make as many choices before the action begins as possible, so I am not fumbling with settings when the good stuff goes down!

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I recently noticed my camera had a lot of dirt on it, so I took it to the nearest creek and threw it in for a good scrubbing. OK, maybe not, what actually happened was every photographer’s nightmare. Setting up on the side of a creek to photograph a series of rapids, I tripped, with the result of my camera getting a solid dunking.

Now, speaking from experience, this is what we call an “Oh [email protected]#t!!!…” moment. A 10 on the “Brown Pants” scale. In other words, an unpleasant experience.  However, quick action and a proper drying out process can, in some cases, save your gear from an untimely demise. Despite its underwater expedition, my DSLR is still alive and well thanks to the tips below.

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