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The term “texture” is a catch-all term for adding either abstract images, detailed photos, or patterns of different surfaces, like metal, cracked paint, sand, etc. as an overlay on your image. This is a type of “compositing”, combining multiple images into one finished work. Adding textures to your images can change the mood, create special effects, strengthen the composition, or help better tell a story.  These five concepts will help you add textures more easily, realistically, and quickly in Adobe Photoshop

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Every animal has a distinct overall body geometry, but this shape will change dramatically as they move.  When you are composing your images, it’s important to understand this concept so you are fitting your frame and composition to them, allowing them to be alive in your shot.

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When we talk about photographing behaviors and events as they unfold, we think in terms of being “reactive”, or shooting on the fly. In a studio setting, we are “proactive”, we make decisions about pretty much every characteristic of the photo before it is taken. My goal with wildlife photography is to be more “proactive” and make as many choices before the action begins as possible, so I am not fumbling with settings when the good stuff goes down!

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I have a new article published today on Photofocus, titled “Wade Right In: A Nature Photographer’s Guide to Wading to Get the Best Shot”. Here’s a sneakpeek… ” …” Check out the rest of the article at this link: Wade

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I have a new article published today on Photofocus, titled “The Life Cycles Approach to Wildlife Photography – Part 2: Capturing the Complete Picture”. Here’s a sneakpeek… ” …” Check out the rest of the article at this link: The

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Every chance you have with a wild animal in front of your lens is an opportunity not just to capture split-second moments of action or behavior, but to also learn more about its life story. The things this creature does daily to survive and thrive in an often harsh world. As photographers, we are storytellers. By telling an animal’s tale through your photography, you reveal one of countless stories being played out as part of a greater whole within the place this animal calls home. Not just the story of an animal, but also a family, a species, an ecosystem, and a planet.

In this article, I’ll share tips on creating wildlife photography through capturing life cycles and histories, all those intimate moments that help define the lives of wild animals. Wildlife photography from a life cycles approach not only gives structure and purpose to your photography, but also adds to the broader knowledge about these creatures, necessary to understand and protect them. Every time you create a wildlife photo, you can help educate others about the general awesomeness that is nature, and the specific awesomeness that is this animal. Pretty cool when you think about it that way! (Have I mentioned I truly love what I do and this is one of the big reasons why! )

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There are places that can be too difficult to stay with a camera and shoot, there are events that are too dangerous to be around when they occur, and there are animals that are too shy of humans to ever get near to photograph. This is when photographers turn to using Photo or Camera Traps, a way to capture these types of images or video from a distance by remote control.  

In part 1 of this series, I covered the fundamentals of creating a simple remote camera trap. Now that you have that skill in your proverbial photography toolbox, let’s talk about more advanced setups and how to use the Platypod to support multi-light nighttime photo traps and remote video capture.

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I have a new article published today on Photofocus, titled “Get Eye Level to Make More Powerful Animal Photos”. Here’s a sneakpeek… ” …” Check out the rest of the article at this link: Get Eye Level to Make More

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Go out into the great outdoors. Find a place that animals like to hang out when people aren’t around. Set up your camera to automatically a photo of them when they do show up. Leave it there. Come back tomorrow and see if you got any shots. Repeat it all over again until you get the shots you need. Welcome to Remote Camera Traps!

In previous articles I’ve shared the different ways I’ve used Platypods in my photography. Possibly one of the best uses I have found is in helping set up a successful remote camera trap. The Platypod adds flexibility to the placement of your camera and lighting equipment that can make your trapping endeavors much more likely to pay off with great images.

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One of the constants I see with creative people is this weird need to tear apart our own work.  Many of us focus on the “flaws”, thinking not about the finished piece, but the things we could have done better.  I often

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